Learning Vegas: The basics video settings (Tutorial)

OpenVideo

Use the Video tab to adjust the video format of your project. You can also click the Project Video Properties button on the Video Preview window to display this tab.

Item Description
Template Allows you to select a preset template to automatically configure the controls in the dialog.

You may also manually change the settings and save them as a custom template for future use. To create a new template, enter a name in the text box and click the Save Template button . The new custom template name is added to the drop-down list.

To set your project properties to match the properties of an existing media file, click the Match Media Settings button and browse to the file you want to use.

Width and Height Determines the frame size of your final movie when rendered. The maximum frame size for AVI, MPEG, QuickTime, Windows Media, and still-image output is 2048×2048.

The maximum frame size is 4096×4096.

Field order Determines field order of the frames when drawn on the screen. Consult your capture/video output card’s documentation for the proper field order for your specific device.

  • None (progressive scan): Select this option when viewing the video on a computer. This option ignores interlacing.
  • Upper field first: Select this option (also called odd or field A) for video that will be viewed on a television.
  • Lower field first: Select this option (also called even or field B) for DV output or if Upper field first produces jittery or shaky output.
Pixel aspect ratio Choose a setting from the drop-down list to change the pixel aspect ratio of your project. This setting will depend on your capture/video output card.

Computers display pixels as squares, or a ratio of 1.0. Televisions display pixels as rectangles (ratios other than 1.0).

Using the incorrect setting can result in distortion or stretching. Consult your capture/video output card’s manual for the proper settings.

Output rotation Choose a setting from the drop-down list to rotate your project’s output. Use output rotation to edit projects for display in portrait (rather than landscape) or inverted orientation:

In this example, the video was shot with the camera tripod rotated 90 degrees. However, with the project output unrotated, the video is pillarboxed within the standard landscape frame.

After choosing 90 clockwise° from the Output rotation drop-down list, the Video Preview window is rotated, and the video fills the frame.

If you want to rotate a media file’s orientation, you can use the Rotation drop-down list on the Media Properties dialog.

For more information, see Creating rotated projects.”

Frame rate Choose a setting from the drop-down list to change the frame rate of your project.

The television frame rate in the US, North and Central America, parts of South America, and Japan (NTSC) is 29.97 frames per second (fps). In many parts of the world, including Europe and much of Asia, the television standard is PAL at 25 fps. France, Russia, and most of Eastern Europe use SECAM, which is a variation on PAL and also uses 25 fps.

Stereoscopic 3D mode Choose a setting from the drop-down list to create a stereoscopic 3D project, or choose Off to create a 2D project.

By default, the project’s Stereoscopic 3D mode, Swap Left/Right, and crosstalk cancellation settings will also be used when previewing and rendering your project, but you can override the project settings if necessary.

For more information, see Setting up your stereoscopic 3D project.”

Pixel format Choose a setting from the drop-down list to indicate whether you want to perform video processing (compositing, scaling, previewing, rendering, and most video plug-ins) using 8-bit or 32-bit, floating-point arithmetic.

  • 8-bit: Performs video processing using 8-bit arithmetic and in the video (studio RGB, or 16-235) color space.
  • 32-bit floating point (video levels): Performs video processing using 32-bit arithmetic and in the video color space.
  • 32-bit floating point (full range): Performs video processing using 32-bit arithmetic and in the full-range color space.The 32-bit floating point settings allow greater precision for processing video, but require significantly more processing power than working with 8-bit video.

Tips:

  • 32-bit floating point (video levels) is recommended when working with 10-bit YUV input/output or when using xvYCC/x.v.Color media.
  • When using 8-bit input/output, the 32-bit floating point (video levels) setting can prevent banding from compositing that contains fades, feathered edges, or gradients.
  • Video plug-ins and media generators that support floating-point processing are included in the 32-bit floating point folder in the Transitions, Video FX, Media Generators, Compositors, and Plug-In Manager windows.
  • If you’re creating a 32-bit project, you can increase performance during editing and playback by using the 8-bit setting during editing and switching to 32-bit floating point (video levels) before rendering.
Compositing gamma When you choose 32-bit floating point (full range) from the Pixel format drop-down list, you can choose a compositing gamma value.

  • 1.000 (Linear): The default setting when you choose 32-bit floating point (full range) from the Pixel format drop-down list.
  • 2.222 (Video): Processing in 8-bit video is always performed using a setting of 2.222.
View transform Choose the reference view transform to use for the project. For more information, see Enabling color management in your Vegas Pro project.”
Full-resolution rendering quality Choose a setting from the drop-down list to set the quality of the rendered video.

Unless you have specific performance problems, choose Good. Choosing Best can dramatically increase rendering times.

Good uses bilinear scaling without integration, while Best uses bicubic scaling with integration. If you’re using high-resolution stills (or video) that will be scaled down to the final output size, choosing Best can prevent artifacts.

Some file formats allow you to associate a video rendering quality setting with a custom rendering template. Final rendering template settings override the Full-resolution rendering quality setting in the Project Properties dialog. For more information, see Custom rendering templates.”

Motion blur type Choose a setting from the drop-down list to choose the curve that is used to blur frames when you add a motion blur envelope to the video bus track. For more information, see Video bus track.”

Motion blurring creates the illusion of motion on individual frames (much like using a long exposure time) and can make computer-generated animation appear more smooth and natural.

  • Gaussian: Gives more weight to the central frame in the blur and less weight to the outer frames. A bell-shaped curve is used between the central and outer frames. Gaussian blur is the best choice in most situations where blurring is required.
  • Pyramid: Gives more weight to the central frame in the blur and the least weight to the outer frames. A linear slope is used between the central and outer frames.
  • Box: Uses an equal weighting for all frames, essentially averaging the frames in the blur.

The Gaussian (asymmetric), Pyramid (asymmetric), and Box (asymmetric) settings use only the left half of each curve, from the central frame back. Asymmetric settings create a hard leading edge with a trailing blur behind the moving object.

Deinterlace method Choose a setting from this drop-down list to determine the method used to render effects and deinterlace the two fields that make up a frame.

  • None: Performs no deinterlacing.
  • Blend fields: Uses contents from both fields and works well for high-detail, low-motion video.
  • Interpolate: Uses a single field at a time and works well for high-motion, low-detail video.

No deinterlacing occurs in the Draft and Preview video preview modes. The Good and Best modes apply the selected deinterlacing method.

Adjust source media to better match project or render settings Select this check box if you want Vegas Pro to scale images or adjust interlacing to allow media files to work better with your project.

This setting will correct for the following types of inconsistencies:

  • DV media will be cropped for 320×240 Internet renders to prevent letterboxing.
  • DV widescreen media will be cropped in HD projects.
  • HD media will be cropped in DV widescreen projects.
  • 486-line media will be cropped in 480-line projects.
  • 480-line media will be padded in 486-line projects.

When the check box is cleared, source media files are processed with their native settings.

Prerendered files folder Prerendered video files are saved to this folder so that you don’t need to rerender the project every time you view it. For more information, see Selectively prerender video.”

If you want to change the location of the folder, click the Browse button and choose a location. Ideally, this location should be on a different hard drive than the one where your operating system is installed.

Prerendered files can consume significant drive space. Select a folder on an a/v-capable drive with ample free space: DV requires approximately 228 MB per minute.

Free storage space in selected folder Displays the total amount of available space on the selected drive.

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